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beckybakerphotography:

LIFE END.

Benga -> January 12 2011 - October 11 2011

i will miss you, i’m sad this day came so soon. Goodbye Bengi. <3 xxxxx

©BeckyBaker

REVIEW OF MY FMP

When starting the fmp, my original intentions were to create a series of nude portraits showing shape and form in an abstract style following the movement of pictorialism which was popular with fine art photographers in the early 20th century. I wanted to use a range of mediums such as Polaroid, medium format and large format, experimenting with darkroom processes such as sepia toning, liquid light and cyanotypes and also creating images with slow shutter speeds to create ghostly effects. I wanted to use both studio and locations, such as an abandoned building, beach, field and graveyard.

 

My ideas originally came from reading photography books and collecting names of photographers with a style and content that was interesting to me; I also went to exhibitions in Manchester but was most inspired by the shadows catchers’ exhibition that we went to in London at the V&A. In addition to this I used the internet and blogs to collect more research and images to add to my sketchbook. All of my research artists have a fine art photography style focussing on nudes and often surrealism. I found many artists that influenced me but the key ones are – Bill Brandt, Lucien Clergue, Toto Frima, Man Ray, Francesca Woodman, Sally Mann, Robert Mapplethorpe, Arno Rafael Minkkinnen, Edward Weston and Floris Neususs.

 

I took a lot of elements from my research into my own work such as the abstract styles of nude portraits, I feel they mostly compare to Bill Brandt and Edward Weston. My Peoplegrams have elements of Floris Neususs’ style, my Polaroid’s have a similar edge to toto frima but with differences to the mood and I only used black and white. I definitely feel that my work carries the same sort of atmosphere that Francesca Woodman has in her work, especially in my moving sequences and shoot in the graveyard but with the finished look like Sally Mann’s wet plate process. Although my concept is definitely its own I think it has a similar feel to that of Bill Brandt, Francesca Woodman and Adam Fuss, as if we are trying to portray similar feelings. Adam Fuss said in an interview in the shadow catcher’s exhibition – ‘You don’t create, you die. You know, you’re not creative, you die. It’s just about survival really.’ And I feel the same way with my own work.

 

During my fmp my intentions changed slightly with things such as my concept. As I went along I realised that I wasn’t just trying to show pictorialism and the beauty of the body, I had known inside but hadn’t quite realised that it’s about how I view life, my beliefs about what life really is, if we truly have a purpose and whether there is actually a difference between life and death. I also made other changes such as which photographs I wanted to be my main prints in the exhibition, because at first I thought it should be my male nudes but in the end I felt that my peoplegrams were more powerful despite their simplicity.

 

My project went really well without too many problems it was just minor things that could be fixed easily. For example using Polaroid and not being able to control the light or the heat interfering with them, not placing the sheet back in the dark slide correctly and it falling out but all I had to do was reshoot, finding an old fashioned window frame to fit my images for the exhibition but in the end I got beautiful brown frames that I love. When staining my book pages with tea, it did fall apart but I just glued it back together. The only major problems I had were with liquid light and cyanotype but I didn’t have time in the end to correct them, I don’t feel that my project is missing anything without them though. My other problems encountered with making my image viewer, I wanted to get them reversal processed but I couldn’t get it done so I ended up printing on acetate which is lower res but I think that they look amazing and older, which is what I was going for!

 

In conclusion I am confident that my images fit into my chosen field both ascetically and conceptually, due to using medium and large format cameras, using only darkroom processes and no digital cameras or editing and have created a body of work with an artistic style with a deep meaning behind it that my audience can connect with and think about. I am also confident that I have reflected my initial intentions well with minor changes to the concept but always with the same ideas in mind, which I have created just as I had imagined at the start of the project. It is also very clear that I have drawn lots of inspiration and thoughts from my research, just by looking at my images. And lastly I feel that my work definitely has impact as an exhibition piece. The exhibition part of the project is really important to me; it is the way that I want my audience to view my images. I think that in an exhibition the audience can really interact and connect with the work on display. I have thought about how my work should be presented and have managed to complete this. I have made my frames, book and chest all a dark brown to provide a colour scheme that works with my style of photography and help to create order. I have produced visually interesting prints myself for the two main framed images and an interactive book that is full of my prints and an image viewer that is also an interactive way of viewing my images in a sequence.

Overall I am extremely happy with the journey of creating my work and my finished result!

 

My two final prints to be framed!

©BeckyBaker

I finished my book for the exhibition! :D

a few of the pages from it here.

©BeckyBaker

Adam Fuss

Adam Fuss

Floris Neususs

Floris Neususs

Linda Mccartney - sun prints
Boy shape 1

Linda Mccartney - sun prints

Boy shape 1

beckybakerphotography:

LIFE END.

Benga -> January 12 2011 - October 11 2011

i will miss you, i’m sad this day came so soon. Goodbye Bengi. <3 xxxxx

©BeckyBaker

REVIEW OF MY FMP

When starting the fmp, my original intentions were to create a series of nude portraits showing shape and form in an abstract style following the movement of pictorialism which was popular with fine art photographers in the early 20th century. I wanted to use a range of mediums such as Polaroid, medium format and large format, experimenting with darkroom processes such as sepia toning, liquid light and cyanotypes and also creating images with slow shutter speeds to create ghostly effects. I wanted to use both studio and locations, such as an abandoned building, beach, field and graveyard.

 

My ideas originally came from reading photography books and collecting names of photographers with a style and content that was interesting to me; I also went to exhibitions in Manchester but was most inspired by the shadows catchers’ exhibition that we went to in London at the V&A. In addition to this I used the internet and blogs to collect more research and images to add to my sketchbook. All of my research artists have a fine art photography style focussing on nudes and often surrealism. I found many artists that influenced me but the key ones are – Bill Brandt, Lucien Clergue, Toto Frima, Man Ray, Francesca Woodman, Sally Mann, Robert Mapplethorpe, Arno Rafael Minkkinnen, Edward Weston and Floris Neususs.

 

I took a lot of elements from my research into my own work such as the abstract styles of nude portraits, I feel they mostly compare to Bill Brandt and Edward Weston. My Peoplegrams have elements of Floris Neususs’ style, my Polaroid’s have a similar edge to toto frima but with differences to the mood and I only used black and white. I definitely feel that my work carries the same sort of atmosphere that Francesca Woodman has in her work, especially in my moving sequences and shoot in the graveyard but with the finished look like Sally Mann’s wet plate process. Although my concept is definitely its own I think it has a similar feel to that of Bill Brandt, Francesca Woodman and Adam Fuss, as if we are trying to portray similar feelings. Adam Fuss said in an interview in the shadow catcher’s exhibition – ‘You don’t create, you die. You know, you’re not creative, you die. It’s just about survival really.’ And I feel the same way with my own work.

 

During my fmp my intentions changed slightly with things such as my concept. As I went along I realised that I wasn’t just trying to show pictorialism and the beauty of the body, I had known inside but hadn’t quite realised that it’s about how I view life, my beliefs about what life really is, if we truly have a purpose and whether there is actually a difference between life and death. I also made other changes such as which photographs I wanted to be my main prints in the exhibition, because at first I thought it should be my male nudes but in the end I felt that my peoplegrams were more powerful despite their simplicity.

 

My project went really well without too many problems it was just minor things that could be fixed easily. For example using Polaroid and not being able to control the light or the heat interfering with them, not placing the sheet back in the dark slide correctly and it falling out but all I had to do was reshoot, finding an old fashioned window frame to fit my images for the exhibition but in the end I got beautiful brown frames that I love. When staining my book pages with tea, it did fall apart but I just glued it back together. The only major problems I had were with liquid light and cyanotype but I didn’t have time in the end to correct them, I don’t feel that my project is missing anything without them though. My other problems encountered with making my image viewer, I wanted to get them reversal processed but I couldn’t get it done so I ended up printing on acetate which is lower res but I think that they look amazing and older, which is what I was going for!

 

In conclusion I am confident that my images fit into my chosen field both ascetically and conceptually, due to using medium and large format cameras, using only darkroom processes and no digital cameras or editing and have created a body of work with an artistic style with a deep meaning behind it that my audience can connect with and think about. I am also confident that I have reflected my initial intentions well with minor changes to the concept but always with the same ideas in mind, which I have created just as I had imagined at the start of the project. It is also very clear that I have drawn lots of inspiration and thoughts from my research, just by looking at my images. And lastly I feel that my work definitely has impact as an exhibition piece. The exhibition part of the project is really important to me; it is the way that I want my audience to view my images. I think that in an exhibition the audience can really interact and connect with the work on display. I have thought about how my work should be presented and have managed to complete this. I have made my frames, book and chest all a dark brown to provide a colour scheme that works with my style of photography and help to create order. I have produced visually interesting prints myself for the two main framed images and an interactive book that is full of my prints and an image viewer that is also an interactive way of viewing my images in a sequence.

Overall I am extremely happy with the journey of creating my work and my finished result!

 

My two final prints to be framed!

©BeckyBaker

I finished my book for the exhibition! :D

a few of the pages from it here.

©BeckyBaker

Adam Fuss

Adam Fuss

Floris Neususs

Floris Neususs

Linda Mccartney - sun prints
Boy shape 1

Linda Mccartney - sun prints

Boy shape 1

©BeckyBaker

©BeckyBaker

©BeckyBaker

©BeckyBaker

©BeckyBaker

©BeckyBaker

©BeckyBaker

©BeckyBaker

©BeckyBaker

©BeckyBaker

©BeckyBaker

©BeckyBaker

©BeckyBaker

©BeckyBaker

REVIEW OF MY FMP

About:

My actual photography blog www.beckybakerphotography.tumblr.com

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